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What supplements should you take?

June 22, 2018

 

Supplement use is always a controversial topic, with everyone seeming to have an opinion on what works and what doesn’t. There seems to be so many different opinions from so many different people, and no real definite answer as to what actually works. In this article we will examine a whole range of supplements to tell you which one’s work, and are backed by science, and which ones are completely useless.

 

Protein powder

We will start off with one of the most commonly used supplements that everyone will be familiar with. This one is a very simple answer, as most people are aware of how important protein is in the process of muscle building and muscle repair. Protein powder or protein supplements have the same properties as protein sources from food, such as lean meats. Protein powders are a cost effective, easy source of protein, so get a big thumbs up from us here at Full Force Results

 

Creatine

Another one of the very few supplements which has concrete scientific evidence proving its benefits is creatine. This is another supplement that we here at Full Force Results recommends alongside protein powder. We will link scientific research papers below this article providing evidence for the use of creatine as a training supplement. 5 gramms of creatine supplementation will allow a slight improvement in gym performance over a longer duration of time. Considering it is a very cheap supplement, we fully recommend this supplement to our clients.

 

BCAA’s (Branch chain amino acids)

If you were to listen to the supplement companies, BCAA supplements are as important for muscle growth as protein powders and creatine. There is no denying BCAA’s serve a very useful purpose, but nearly everyone will get enough BCAA’s if they just focus on consuming a healthy diet with enough protein. Unless you are training multiple times a day as a high level athlete, we here at Full Force results wouldn’t recommend taking BCAA’s as a supplement.

 

Fish oil

Fish oil is a fantastic supplement that most people should be looking to take for general health purposes. Benefits range from helping to aid in treatments for high cholesterol, obesity and a weakened immune system, as well as helping to reduce inflammation and the risk of arthritis. Most of these benefits can be attributed to the presence of omega 3 essential fatty acids within the fish oil. For all of our clients who struggle to consume enough of these omega 3 essential fatty acids, this supplement is a must.

 

Multi-vitamins

Multi-vitamins are supplements where there is much debate as to their actual effectiveness. There is no clear consensus on whether multivitamins are actually that useful, and most health experts believe it certainly should be no replacement for a healthy well balanced diet. The primary focus of everyone should be to consume a healthy balanced diet, so then there is no need to take a risk using multivitmains. We won’t recommend multivitamins to clients, but try to focus our clients on consuming a healthy and balanced diet.

 

Fat burners

For a long time, fat burners were thought of as a useless product that have no tangible effects. However, there is evidence showing some fat burners do work and can aid in weight loss. Even though some may work, there certainly are a number of drawbacks associated with them. The truth is that they can help only alongside a healthy balanced diet and exercise, so is not going to help someone who eats junk food and is sedentary all day. Other problems include an increase in tolerance over time, as well as worries over exactly what is used in these products. For these reasons we don’t recommend the use of fat burners.

 

Beta-Alanine

A recently popularised supplement is Beta-Alanine, which has got a lot of attention recently due to its effects on muscular endurance. Studies conducted have shown it to increase physical performance in the 60-240 second range. For most recreational lifters in the gym we would not recommend this supplement due to its limited application. Most exercises will be performed in the range of 0-60 seconds, rendering this supplement not very useful. Unless you are regularly training between 60-240 seconds, we wouldn’t recommend this supplement.

 

The one takeaway from this post is that supplements can play a significant yet minimal role in your training and health, and that they should only be considered after the fundamentals of good training, nutrition and adequate sleep are in place. If you have any further questions or comments, please leave them below.

 

Disclaimer

The information provided in this publication is for educational and informational purposes only and does not serve as a replacement to care provided by your own personal health care team or physician. The author does not render or provide medical advice, and no individual should make any medical decisions or change their health behavior based on information provided here. Readers are encouraged to confirm the information contained herein with other sources. Readers and consumers should review the information in this publication carefully with their professional health care provider. The information in this or other publications authored by the writer is not intended to replace medical advice offered by physicians. Reliance on any information provided by the author is solely at your own risk.

The author does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, medication, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be presented in the publication. The author does not control information, advertisements, content, and articles provided by discussed third-party information suppliers. Further, the author does not warrant or guarantee that the information contained in written publications, from him or any source is accurate or error-free. The author accepts no responsibility for materials contained in the publication that you may find offensive. You are solely responsible for viewing and/or using the material contained in the authored publications in compliance with the laws of your country of residence, and your personal conscience. The author will not be liable for any direct, indirect, consequential, special, exemplary, or other damages arising from the use of information contained in this or other publications.

 

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